Complaints

Have a question?  Contact the Division at (801) 530-6601 during normal business hours.  Please do not submit questions through the "File a Complaint" or "Tell Your Story" buttons below.

Begin the official complaint process, which may result in an investigation and possible legal action by the Division.

Report a person, situation, or problem. This is to help the Division understand what conduct is impacting consumers. The Division will not open a case or respond to inquiries submitted here.

What is your complaint about?

Was your purchase for personal, family, or household use (not business)?

Are you a Utah Resident or did you make the purchase in Utah?  

Is the seller/business in Utah?  

Did you purchase a or a ?

Which of the following best describes your issue?

Have you complied with the terms of the warranty?

Has the business complied with the terms of the warranty?

Did the business tell you when it would ship your purchase?  

Has the shipment date passed?  

Have the goods been shipped?  

Generally, a business has not violated the law if it shipped the goods within the time it represented.

If goods have been lost during shipment, you should contact the shipment carrier.

Contact the business and request documentation that your goods have been shipped.

If they cannot provide the documentation, or if it is clear that the goods have not been shipped, please  .

If a business provides a specific shipment date, then there is generally not a shipment-related violation of the law until the shipment date passes.  The law requires a business to ship goods by the shipment date it represents.  It may take additional time for goods to be delivered.

If the business represented a specific delivery date that has passed,   .

Were the goods shipped within 30 days of the transaction?  

Generally, a supplier has not violated the law as long as they can show that they shipped the item within the represented time period.

If your item has been lost in the mail, you should file a claim with the mail carrier.

STUFF GOES HERE

Contact the business and request documentation showing that your goods have been shipped.

If you cannot get the documentation, or if it is clear that the goods have not been shipped, please  .

What best describes your refund issue?

Which of the following best describes your issue?

Is the busiess refusing to honor the warranty?

Workmanship issues are generally not within the Division's jurisdiction.

You may need to seek legal council to advise you on how to resolve your issue.

You may also call the Division during normal business hours at (801) 530-6601 to speak with an investigator.

Did you have a business prior to this transaction?

The Division generally does not have jursidiction over purchases that are made by businesses or for business use.

If this purchase was for personal use, .

If this purchase was made over the telephone,

Our Consumer Referral Guide may also help you determine which agency, if any, can best address your issue.

You may also call the Division during normal business hours at (801) 530-6601 to speak with an investigator.

Franchises are regulated by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), which requires that certain disclosues be given to prospective buyers.  You can read about those disclosures here.

Did the franchise seller provide disclosures to you?

The Franchise seller may need to file a notice with the Division if a franchise is going to be located in Utah or the purchaser of a franchise is a Utah resident.

If the franchise you purchased is, or will be, located in Utah or you are a Utah resident, please call us directly at (801) 530-6601 to speak with an invesigator.

If the franchise you purchased is, or will be, located outside of Utah and you are not a Utah resident, it is unlikely the Division would be able to assist you.  We recommend you browse to https://www.usa.gov/state-consumer to find the Consumer Protection office in your state, or the state of franchise.

Was the price $500.00 or more?

Please review the .

Was the training or coaching intented to help you start a business?

Did you purchase a franchise?

Was the product you purchased intended to enable you to start a business?

Was the sale made over the phone?

Are you a Utah resident?

Which of the following best describes the scam?

Did you pay the government imposter?

If you have been contacted by a government impostor, and paid them money, you should:

If you sent money to an impostor using the mail, or the impostor contacted you through mail, you may also want to file a complaint with the United States Postal Inspection Service (USPIS).

If the impostor contacted you by telephone, you may also want to file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

If the impostor contacted you using email or the internet, you may want to file a complaint with the FBI Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3).

If you paid using a bank or credit card, you should file a complaint with that institution.

If you have been contacted by a government impostor, you should .

You can also .

How did the impostor contact you?

You may want to .

You can also .

You may want to .

You can also .

Did you pay or send the scammer money or anything of value?

If you have not paid or sent the scammer money or anything of value, you should .

You can also .

Did you receive a check from the scammer?

Have you sent the scammer money or anything of value?

Has the scammer asked you to send money or anything of value?

Did you send the scammer money or anything of value?

If you have been targeted by a tech scammer:

Is the impostor or scammer in Utah?

Is the impostor or scammer in the United States?

The Division likely does not have jurisdiction in your case.

You may need to file a complaint with another state's consumer protection agency.  A list of consumer protection agencies can be found at: https://www.usa.gov/state-consumer

You can also contact us directly at (801) 530-6601 to speak to a Division employee if you need more information.

The Division likely does not have jurisdiction in your case.

For international scams, you can file a complaint at www.econsumer.gov.

Was this a robocall?  (It may have sounded realistic, but the caller was a pre-recorded message.)

The division regulates robocalls if they are made under certain circumstances.

Did you agree to receive a telephone solicitation from the person or business that robocalled you?

Do you have an established business relationship with the person or business that robocalled you?

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) also regulates some robocalls.

You may file a complaint with the FTC at: https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov

Are you a Utah resident?

Was the call from someone in Utah or a Utah business?

Are you a Utah resident?

Was the call from someone in Utah or a Utah business?

Is your number on the National Do-Not-Call Registry?

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) regulates some robocalls.

You may file a complaint with the FTC at: https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov.

If you were given a call-back number, you can also with the Division.

Did the caller try to sell you something or try to get you to pay something?
(A sale includes making an appointment for an in-person sales presentation.)

Was the call a debt collection call?

Which of the following best describes your situation?

A federal law, the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), addresses unfair practices by debt collectors.

You can find information on the FDCPA and your rights when being contacted by a debt collector on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's website:
https://www.consumerfinance.gov/consumer-tools/debt-collection/

You can check whether your number is included on the National Do-Not-Call Registry online at https://www.donotcall.gov or by calling 1-888-382-1222.

Is your number included on the National Do-Not-Call Registry?

Was the call from someone in Utah or a Utah business?

Based on your responses, the Division likely would not have jurisdiction in this matter.

You may consider filing a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) at: https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov

You may also consider filing a complaint with your state's consumer protection agency or the consumer protection agency of the state where the caller is located.

A list of the consumer protection agencies for each state can be found at: https://www.usa.gov/state-consumer.

The U.S. Department of Education maintains a searchable database of accredited post-secondary institutions and programs.

First,

Is your complaint against an accredited institution?

The U.S. Department of Education has jurisdiction over most conduct by accredited institutions or programs.

However, the Division may have jurisdiction in cases where misrepresentations or unauthorized charges occur.

My complaint is about:

Which of the following best describes your complaint?

Did you attend a course or program?

Were you charged tuition or fees?

The Division maintains a list of registered post-secondary institutions.

First,

Is the institution registered with the Division?

Which of the following best describes your complaint?

Was this an honorary degree?

Is your complaint against an attorney?

Which of the following best describes the service you purchased?

Did the person:

Is the person a registered immigration consultant?

If you are unsure, click here to Search Registered Entities.

Which of the following best describes your complaint?

Which best describes the advertising problem?

Were you charged for the referral?

Which of the following best describes your complaint?

Attorney conduct is generally regulated by the Utah State Bar.

You can find information about reporting these types of issues to the Utah State Bar at: http://www.utahbar.org/public-services/

If you need more information, you can also contact us directly during normal business hours at (801) 530-6601 to speak to a Division investigator.

The Utah State Bar maintains a directory of attorneys that are authorized to practice law in Utah.

Click here to search the directory, then answer the following question:

Is your complaint against an attorney?

Are you a Utah resident?

The Division generally does not have jurisdiction over identity theft matters.

You can find information on what to do by visiting the Utah Attorney General's ID Theft Central website at https://idtheft.utah.gov or the Federal Trade Commission (FTC)'s website at https://identitytheft.gov.

If your identity was stolen by someone outside of the United States, you may also consider filing a complaint with https://www.econsumer.gov

Is the identity thief in Utah?

You may consider filing a complaint in the state where you reside.

A searchable database of state consumer protection agencies can be found at https://www.usa.gov/state-consumer

If your identity was stolen by someone outside of the United States, you may also consider filing a complaint with https://www.econsumer.gov

Was the vehicle purchased or leased new?

Was the dealer located in Utah?

How many times has the dealer repaired or attempted to repair the same issue with the vehicle within 12 months from the date of purchase?

Has the vehicle been out of service because of repair for a cumulative total of 30 or more business days, within the first 12 months from the date of purchase?

Does the vehicle still have the issue or issues?

Does the manufacturer have an informal dispute settlement procedure?

You can find this information in your vehicle warranty manual or owner's manual.

Have you gone through the manufacturer's informal dispute settlement procedure?

What kind of issue are you trying to report?

You will need to file your complaint with the appropriate state agency in the state where the dealer is located.

A list of the consumer protection agencies for each state can be found at: https://www.usa.gov/state-consumer

Based on your responses, your vehicle may not yet meet the requirements of the New Motor Vehicles Warranties Act.

You can review the New Motor Vehicles Warranties Act at the following link: https://le.utah.gov/xcode/Title13/Chapter20/13-20.html

Based on your responses, it appears that the issue(s) have been resolved.

If the issue(s) come back within 18 months from the date of purchase, please contact the Division of Consumer Protection again.

Generally, if a manufacturer has an informal dispute settlement procedure, then the section of the New Motor Vehicles Warranties Act concerning refunds or replacement will not apply to a consumer who does not first go through that informal dispute settlement procedure.

You may review the New Motor Vehicles Warranties Act at the following link: https://le.utah.gov/xcode/Title13/Chapter20/13-20.html.

Please visit https://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/ivoq/Complaint.cfm to file your safety complaint with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Which of the following best describes your complaint?

Which statement below best describes your complaint?

United States Postal Service (USPS) Publication 307 explains how to stop receiving unwanted obscene mail.

You can opt out of prescreened offers by visiting: https://www.optoutprescreen.com

Did the business or seller make a misrepresentation in the advertisement?

Did you enter a game, drawing, or sweepstake that resulted in the prize notice being sent to you?

Which of the following best describes your issue?

Are you required to pay something in order to receive the prize?

Are you required to make contact with the business or seller in order to receive the prize?

Is the bill from a business or seller you do, or have done, business with?

Contact the business or seller and make sure the bill is legitimate.  Do not use the contact information on the suspicious bill.  Instead, find and use the contact information for the business or seller that you know to be accurate.

Is the bill a legitimate bill?

Were you charged for the item?

Which of the following statements best describes your complaint?

Was the purchase over $25.00?

Were you given a copy of the contract?

Is the contract in the same language as the sales presentation?

Did the seller include a 3-day right to cancel on the first page of the contract?

Did you attempt to cancel within 3 days of signing the contract, or receiving the service or item (whichever came later)?

Many cities have local laws that require door-to-door solicitors to have a soliciting license, or that prevent them from soliciting at homes with "no soliciting" signs.

You should contact your city government to determine what laws are in place in your municipality.

A searchable list of city and county governments can be found at: https://www.utah.gov/government/citycounty.html.

We need more information in order to assist you.
Please call us directly at (801) 530-6601 during normal business hours to speak with an investigator.

It is unlikely that the Division is able to assist with this issue.

We recommend you browse to https://www.usa.gov/state-consumer to find the Consumer Protection office in your state, or the state of purchase.

Download, complete, and submit the Complaint Form with any accompanying documentation.

Online Form Coming Soon!

Section 1: Your Information

Section 2: Information About the Company You Are Complaining Against